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    Adapted from Seelig, 1964 and Pennington, 1989

     

     

    In general, magnesium content in each subgroup is listed in descending order.

     

    To increase magnesium in your diet, emphasize items listed in left-hand or center column and at the top of each sub-group.

     

    Very High Magnesium

    cocoa and bitter chocolate

    High Magnesium

    Nuts:

    cashews

    almonds

    Brazil nuts

    peanuts

    pecans

    Hazel nuts

    walnuts

    fresh/dried coconut

    Seafood:

    winkles

    conch

    shrimp

    whelks

    clams

    cockles

    crab

    Vegetables:

    soybeans

    butter beans

    soy flour

    beans/peas

    beet greens

    chard

    spinach

    collards

    seaweed

    Grains:

    all bran

    raw oats

    whole barley

    whole wheat bread

    brown rice

    corn meal

    rye flour

    Fruits:

    dried figs

    dried apricots

    dates

    Medium Magnesium

    Nuts & Fruits:

    chestnuts

    dried peaches

    dried prunes

    avocado

    bananas

    raisins

    blackberries

    Seafood:

    boiled lobster

    prawns

    oysters

    canned sardines

    mackerel

    bluefish

    salmon

    herring

    haddock

    flounder

    Vegetables:

    parsley

    sweet corn

    okra

    kale

    kohlrabi

    horseradish

    dandelion

    cabbage, raw

    brussels sprouts

    artichokes

    potatoes & skin

    Grains:

    corn meal

    white flour

    pearled barley

    white rice

    macaroni, raw

    Dairy:

    hard cheese

    Meats:

    liver

    heart

    bacon

    corned beef

    lean roast beef

    steak

    veal

    chicken & turkey

    Low Magnesium

    Meat & Fish:

    lean roast pork

    grilled lamb

    beef tongue

    ham

    roast beef w/ fat

    kidney, brain

    halibut

    cod

    Fruits:

    raspberries

    cantaloupe

    cherries

    strawberries

    plums

    peaches

    oranges

    pineapple

    grapefruit

    apricots

    apples

    pears

    cranberries

    grapes

    Vegetables:

    boiled potatoes

    boiled peas

    boiled broccoli

    beets

    boiled cauliflower

    carrots

    mushrooms

    onions

    eggplant

    lettuce

    tomatoes

    cucumber

    asparagus

    Dairy:

    eggs

    milk

    butter

    cream

    Grains:

    boiled macaroni

    boiled white rice

    white flour products

    pastries

    Extras:

    Sugar

     

     

     

     

    You Can Add Foods You Eat and Like To This Resource

     

    Can’t find a food on this list? You can add the foods you eat to the proper column in Resource I - part A by looking up the food in the National Agriculture Library Database, free on the internet. http://www.nal.usda.gov/fnic/foodcomp/search/ The database contains analyses of foods for many nutrients on a per 100 grams basis, or per tablespoon or cup. Look up your food on the “per 100 grams” basis. The foods in column one - high magnesium - are greater than 100 milligrams magnesium per 100 grams. Column two foods - medium magnesium - have between 25 and 100 milligrams magnesium per 100 grams. Column three foods - those low in magnesium - have less than 25 milligrams magnesium per 100 grams.

     

    To get to the database:

     

    Log into the internet.

    Go to http://www.nal.usda.gov/fnic/foodcomp/search/

    Type in the food you want to know about in the search window. You will probably get a list of foods.

    Select the food you want.

    Select “per 100 g”.

    Scroll down to “Minerals” to magnesium

    This is the magnesium content of that food in milligrams per 100 grams of food.

     

    If the number is greater than 100, the food goes in column 1 and is a high magnesium food.

     

    If the number is between 25 and 99, the food goes in column 2 and is a medium magnesium food.

     

    If the number is below 25, it is a low magnesium food and goes in column 3.

     

     

    Note that this database also gives you the calcium content of each food, also in milligrams per 100 grams. From this and the magnesium content you can calculate the magnesium to calcium ratio of that food.

     

    Divide the magnesium value by the calcium value. If the resulting value is greater than 1, the food has more magnesium than calcium, and has a good ratio. If the resulting value is less than 0.5, then there is twice as much calcium as magnesium in that food, at least, and the ratio is beginning to be unbalanced. However, remember that it is the ratio of calcium to magnesium in your total diet, including supplements and water, that is important.

     

    We recommend an overall, total ratio of 2 calcium to 1 magnesium, by weight, as a goal.